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It is a long journey ahead: Kejriwal

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ARVIND KEJRIWAL

‘We want to pressure the government and assert our rights as citizens.’

Arvind Kejriwal received the Magsaysay award in the Emergent leadership category in 2006. A mere five years later, he has far surpassed that milestone, winning acclaim and notice for the way he conceived and crafted Anna Hazare‘s anti-corruption movement. He talks to Vidya Subrahmaniamabout the Jan Lokpal campaign, what it accomplished and why it often became controversial.

The scale and spread of the Anna movement have baffled many. How did this happen?

A movement cannot be created out of nothing. In this case, anger against corruption was at the point of eruption. Then two things happened. One, instead of merely echoing the anger, the Jan Lokpal Bill (JLB) offered a solution. Second, Anna emerged as a credible leader at a time of huge leadership crisis in politics. See, people did not understand the details of the JBL. They simply saw it as a “dawai” [medicine] for corruption. It is the combination of a solution and a figure like Anna — who lived in a temple with no assets — that clicked.

When we conducted referendums on the JLB, we used to try and explain its contents to people. But they said they did not want to understand the details. They just wanted to put a mohar [stamp] on Anna.

How did you communicate your message to such a large number of people?

Technology played a key role in this. When in January this year, India Against Corruption (IAC) member Shivendra suggested to us that we use Facebook to publicise our rallies, I dismissed it saying Facebook has a limited, urban following. But Shivendra went ahead. We had planned a single rally on January 30 at the Ramlila Maidan. But because we connected on Facebook, we were able to conduct simultaneous rallies in 64 cities. SMS texting also played a critical role. Our SMS communication was designed very intelligently. A company in Mumbai suggested we ask for missed calls as a mark of solidarity. Missed calls cost nothing. In March, we sent out two crore SMS messages and got 50,000 missed calls. Then we targeted the 50,000 callers, asking if they would like to enrol as volunteers for IAC. Initially 13 people responded. We sent two more rounds of messages to the 50,000 callers. And in just one week, the number of volunteers swelled to 800.

Surely television played a disproportionate role in projecting the movement.

TV certainly helped, both when Anna sat on a fast at Jantar Mantar and then at Ramlila Maidan. But the media cannot create a moment. They can at best magnify it. The crowds at Ramlila and the crowds that followed him when he left for Medanta hospital were not manufactured.

There have been reports of dissensions within the Anna camp. Also that the deadlock was broken only because Congress/government negotiators spoke directly to Anna.

Anna appointed Kiran Bedi, Prashant Bhushan and me to negotiate with the government. One day I was very tired and Kiran was also not around. So, Medha and Prashant went for the meeting. The next thing we hear [from the media] is that Kiran and I have been sidelined, that we are hardliners, and we are deliberately preventing Anna from breaking his fast. This was disinformation by the government.

You started with the maximalist position of “Jan Lokpal Bill by August 30 and any amendments only with Anna’s permission.” From that to accepting a “sense-of-the-house” resolution that was not voted upon — wasn’t it a climbdown?

When we started on August 16, there was such an overwhelming response that we thought the government would agree to our demands. People wanted the JLB. After a few days we realised that there was a serious leadership crisis in the government — negotiators were constantly backing off. In the last three days of the fast, it happened four times. The Prime Minister made a conciliatory statement, Rahul Gandhi went off on a tangent. Salman Khurshid, Medha and Prashant sat together and drafted a resolution. Next day [August 27], at 1.30 p.m., Salman said no resolution. It became clear to us that what we wanted — Parliament voting on a resolution containing Anna’s three demands — was not going to happen. Therefore we had to change our strategy.

Are you satisfied with the resolution that was adopted? It is not categorical and leaves escape clauses.

We are satisfied because it contains Anna’s three demands. It will not be easy for the Standing Committee to renege on Parliament’s commitment. We will be keenly watching the Committee’s proceedings and the MPs also ought to know that they are on watch. I know, of course, that it is a long journey ahead.

Kiran Bedi told a TV channel that at one point when all seemed lost, a miracle happened: L.K. Advani called her and gave her his word that a solution will be reached by the following evening [August 27]. She also said that the Bharatiya Janata Party, which until then was ambiguous on the JLB, changed its stand and offered full support to Anna.

We met the leaders of the main political parties thrice and as part of this we also met Mr. Advani. However, we have been clear that no BJP leader or leader of any communal organisation will share the stage with us. This is the decision of our core committee. As for Kiran talking about Mr. Advani, please put that question to her.

So are you an apolitical movement?

No, we are political but we are concerned with people’s politics. The movement will always remain outside of political parties and outside of electoral politics.

You will not float a political party?

No, never. We don’t need to get into the system to fight it. We want to pressure the government and assert our rights as citizens. Everyone who has a dream need not get into politics.

Doubts have been raised about the credentials of those who have donated money to IAC. Sometime ago, a citizens’ group from Hyderabad wrote to you saying it was shocked to see some very discredited names in your list of donors.

A number of people have contributed money to the Anna movement. There is complete transparency from our side. Our receipts and expenditure are transparent. But we have no mechanism to go into the antecedents of our donors. And donations are streaming in, making it impossible to keep track. If there is a glaring case, we will certainly investigate it. I know, for instance, that there has been talk of the Jindal group. But those who donated to IAC are from Sitaram Jindal, not the Jindal mining group.

Your entire fight is about transparency and accountability. One of your NGOs, Public Cause Research Foundation, received donations on behalf of IAC and issued receipts in its name. But until August 29, there was no mention of Anna or the donations on the PCRF website.

That is an oversight. We will immediately update the website and provide a link to IAC.

Another of your NGOs, Kabir, received grants from the Ford Foundation (FF). According to the FF, Kabir received $172,000 in 2005 and $197,000 in 2008. The FF also sanctioned an “in-principle” grant of $200,000 for 2011, which you have not accepted so far. Why does Kabir not mention the FF and these specific details on its website?

We did not give the specific details because we also got some other NRI contributions and these were clubbed together. I will make sure that the website gives the break-up.

Fears have been expressed about the form of mobilisation we saw over the last four months. There was anger and impatience and, some would say, coercion in your methods. During the Ram Rath yatra, too, the BJP said people were angry because the mandir had not been built for 40 years. Aren’t you setting a worrying precedent?

The two situations are not comparable. One was communal and divisive and went against the grain of the Constitution. We are not asking for anything illegal. Our demands resonate with the people and our movement has been unifying, non-violent and entirely within rights given by the Constitution. What is wrong if people demand a strong law against corruption? What is wrong if they ask for the Jan Lokpal Bill?

Why did you ask for Parliamentary due process to be suspended? You didn’t want the JLB to go to the Standing Committee.

The JLB was drafted after wide consultations; it underwent many revisions based on feedback. Where is this kind of discussion in the drafting of anysarkari Bill? The purpose of the Standing Committee is to take multiple views on board. But not all Bills reach the Standing Committee, and in 90 per cent of the cases, the government does not accept the Committee’s recommendations. So why the fuss only for JLB which has been widely discussed and debated?

COURTESY: THE HINDU

Anna Hazare fast: Lokpal debate in House unlikely today over procedural delays

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IIT-Delhi faculty and students show support for Anna Hazare

A debate scheduled in Lok Sabha on various versions of theLokpal Bill, including that of fasting anti-corruption activistAnna Hazare, was unlikely on Friday because of procedural delays. Soon after the debate began, the House was adjourned till 3.30 pm following uproarious scenes by the Opposition.

Parliamentary Affairs minister Pawan Kumar Bansal said the debate may now be held on Saturday. He expressed displeasure over the functioning of the House.

‘Anna ready to break fast’
The developments came as Hazare’s fast entered its 11th day at the Ramlila Maidan. Hazare’s associate Kiran Bedi said the Gandhian activist would end his hunger strike once Parliament passed a resolution that met his demands. These are: the inclusion of lower bureaucracy under Lokpal, a citizens’ charter and the setting up of state Lokayuktas.

“Today is a key moment for India’s future. The resolution by MPs will be victory for every Indian,” Bedi said.

Prashant Bhushan, another Hazare associate, said: “A mere discussion will not do. Parliament will have to pass a resolution indicating that the Lokpal Bill covers the three issues raised by Anna.”

Hazare’s team demanded that Parliament, if need be, hold the debate on Saturday too, saying Hazare’s health was precarious and corruption was a critical issue.

Rahul suggests Lokpal on lines of EC

Rahul Gandhi
Rahul Gandhi in Lok Sabha.

Hazare’s ongoing fast was lauded by Rahul in his Zero Hour speech in Lok Sabha, but he emphasised that the fight against corruption had to move beyond setting up an effective Lokpal.

“We can’t wish away corruption. It will require a comprehensive programme of action. There is a perception that enactment of single Bill will eradicate corruption. I have serious doubts about that,” Rahul said.

“The Lokpal law is just one element in the fight against corruption. Laws are also required on government funding of elections, land issues and mining,” he said, reminding MPs that they had the responsibility of allowing Parliament to function so that such laws could be enacted.

“Why not make the Lokpal a constitutional body like the Election Commission?” asked Rahul, all the while being backed by Congress MPs.

“Democractic processes cannot be undermined. Underming Parliament’s supremacy is dangerous for democracy,” he cautioned. “Let us commit ourselves to truth and probity in life. We owe it to the people of India.”

BJP MPs interrupt Rahul speech
Rahul’s statement sparked off an uproar in the House, with BJP MPs rising from their seats and shouting slogans. His speech was interrupted several times. BJP leader Ananth Kumar later stepped up the attack on the Congress by asking if Rahul or the prime minister was running the government.

Earlier in the day, Rahul met Prime Minister Manmohan Singh, apparently to discuss the Lokpal Bill.

MPs seek debate under Rule 193

Doctors examine Anna Hazare
Doctors examine Anna Hazare at the Ramlila Maidan.

As the Lok Sabha session began on Friday, Congress MPs Jagdambika Pal, Anu Tandon and Sanjay Nirupam gave a notice to Speaker Meira Kumar, seeking a debate on the Jan Lokpal Bill under Rule 193.

This was after Parliamentary Affairs Minister Pawan Bansal expressed doubts whether a debate could take place on Friday as there was no notice for it.

The government had on Thursday agreed to a debate on three versions of the Lokpal Bill in Lok Sabha, giving rise to hopes of a resolution of the ongoing crisis.

Hazare’s team has demanded a Parliament debate under Rule 184, which allows voting.

Team Anna’s draft resolution for Parliment

Supporters of Anna Hazare
Supporters of Hazare in New Delhi.

Hazare’s team has proposed a resolution for Parliament. It reads as:
1) A Lokpal Bill shall be passed by Parliament in the ongoing session, which will set up an independent Lokpal institution at the Centre and an independent Lokayukta institution on the same model in each state.
2) The House further resolves that Lokpal shall have jurisdiction over all public servants at the Centre and the Lokayukta shall have jurisdiction over all public servants in respective states.
3) Such law would require that all government departments make Citizens’ Charters to give information about which public-dealing work being done in how much time and by which officer. Violation of the Citizens’ Charter shall be penalised by Lokpal or Lokayukta.

Anna writes to PM
Hazare also wrote a letter to the prime minister, which was taken to him by Union Minister Vilasrao Deshmukh. The highlights of the letter are:
– I am not sitting on a fast for serving my selfish purpose. I am just a common man and I want to help the poor people of this country. I have no partaking in power politics.
– Our movement is not against any person or any party. We want to fight and remove corruption. During this movement, if anything said by any of the team members has hurt your sentiments, then I apologise on their behalf.
– The common man is getting affected on a day-to-day basis due to corruption.
– (Mentioning the three demands on Lokpal Bill) If these can be accepted by Parliament, I will end my fast. Else I will keep sitting at Ramlila Maidan.

Govt wants assurance from Anna

Supporters of Anna Hazare
Supporters of Anna Hazare shout slogans outside the PM’s residence.

The government has sought a concrete assurance from Hazare that he will break the fast after Parliament takes up his Jan Lokpal Bill.

Congress MP Sandeep Dikshit, one of the negotiators for the government, said Hazare should keep the sanctity of his fast and stick to his words.

“This hunger strike has been an ideal for all. Anna is kind-hearted, I appeal to him to break his fast. He had said he will end his fast as the discussion begins. Since everybody is ready for the discussion, he should end the fast,” he said.

Ministers continue with meetings
Law Minister Salman Khurshid met Finance Minister Pranab Mukherjee to discuss a way out of the deadlock. “We want a collaborative, cooperative resolution in the House. The whole House must be party to it,” Khurshid said.

Team Anna meets Left leaders
A day after meeting the BJP top brass, Hazare’s team met CPI(M) leaders on Friday.

“We are going back to all political parties to ask which provisions of the Lokpal need more clarification,” said Bedi.

After meeting CPI(M) leader Prakash Karat, Bhushan said, “I have given clarifications that the CPI(M) sought. The party has indicated that they by and large support the Jan Lokpal Bill.”

COURTESY: INDIA TODAY

Unlikely Echo of Gandhi Inspires Indians to Act

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SOCIAL ACTIVIST ANNA HAZARE

In a “new” India often obsessed with wealth and status, where cricket batsmen and Bollywood movie stars are wildly idolized, Anna Hazare is a figure from an earlier, seemingly discarded era. His pointed white cap and simple white cotton clothes evoke a Gandhian simplicity.                                                                                   His rural, homespun demeanor ordinarily might elicit snickers from India’s urban elite.

Supporters of Anna Hazare at a rally in New Dehli on Thursday. Mr. Hazare is expected to lead a hunger strike and mass protest.

Yet Mr. Hazare, 74, has emerged as the unlikely face of an impassioned people’s movement in India, a public outpouring that has coalesced around fighting corruption but has also tapped into deeper anxieties in a society buffeted by change.

His arrest on Tuesday, made while he was en route to a park in New Delhi where he intended to commence ahunger strike as part of his anticorruption campaign, drove thousands of people onto city streets across India. Under public pressure, government officials tried to release him within hours, but Mr. Hazare refused to leave jail unless the government released him unconditionally. On Thursday, the two sides reached a compromise, and Mr. Hazare is expected to leave jail on Friday to lead a hunger strike and mass protest in central New Delhi to push his demand that the government create a powerful, independent anticorruption agency.

The popular outpouring he has set off has inevitably drawn comparisons with the democratic uprisings of the Arab Spring. Most analysts agree, though, that India’s moment is a different one. But in its own way it may prove to be no less important.

India already has the democratic freedoms sought by protesters in the Middle East and North Africa and has enjoyed rising global influence after two decades of fast economic growth. Yet India is also experiencing what one observer has called a “churning” period, as public frustrations are boiling over about poor roads, shoddy schools, inflation, rising inequality and the pervasive reach of official corruption.

Running through each of these issues is a deepening public disillusionment with India’s political process and a growing disconnectedness between the governing class and the governed, making the corruption issue especially explosive. As the crowds supporting Mr. Hazare grew larger and more passionate this week, person after person seemed to arrive on the New Delhi streets carrying their own tale of official graft.

“It is the middle class who is worst affected by corruption,” said Asha Bhardaaj, a woman who traveled more than 30 miles from the suburbs to join a rally. “The upper class is not affected. The upper classes can get what they need by paying money.”

Mr. Hazare’s appeal seems partly rooted in the traditional values he embodies. He is a longtime social activist who has campaigned against corruption for nearly two decades in the state of Maharashtra, living off a military pension and financing charitable work through donations. If his clothes evoke Mahatma Gandhi, India’s founding father, then so do his protest tactics of nonviolent hunger strikes and peaceful marches.

Yet Mr. Hazare and his advisers have also proved adept at the necessities of modern politics: they have adroitly outmaneuvered the police and government officials who sought to defuse the anticorruption movement, after the decision to arrest him backfired dramatically. They also have exploited the nonstop, often sensationalistic coverage on India’s television news outlets to build public support for their cause. Mr. Hazare’s face is now visible in almost every corner of India.

Mr. Hazare and his advisers — a group of prominent lawyers and social activists nicknamed Team Anna — have spent months campaigning across the country. His aides distribute a flurry of daily e-mail updates to journalists, and his close advisers have used social media to connect with young followers. Early Thursday, one adviser, Kiran Bedi, used Twitter to announce a breakthrough in negotiations with the authorities.

Later on Thursday, Ms. Bedi released a video of Mr. Hazare made inside Tihar Jail, where he is being held. “I got my energy after seeing the young protesters,” he said. “Today is only the third day of protest. I can continue like this for another 10 or 12 days more.”

The governing Indian National Congress Party, by contrast, has seemed rattled, unprepared for the public anger against the government and incapable of delivering a consistent counterargument. One party spokesman personally attacked Mr. Hazare, describing him as a corrupted figure, while another spokesman blamed the United States for supporting the anticorruption movement.

“This is a moral moment,” said Jayaprakash Narayan, a social activist in the city of Hyderabad. “Everybody is sick and tired of corruption. And in dealing with this, the government has shown no political sense at all. There is a lot of anger in the country, not only to end corruption but to end politics as it is conducted today.”

Mr. Hazare was born Kisan Baburao Hazare in 1937 in rural Maharashtra. He still speaks Marathi as his primary language and eventually assumed the name Anna. Beyond his admiration of Gandhi, Mr. Hazare drew inspiration from Swami Vivekananda, a prominent reformer during the 19th century. Having stumbled across the teachings of Vivekananda while serving in the Indian Army, Mr. Hazare decided to dedicate his life to public service after narrowly escaping death while posted on the Pakistan border, according to his official biography.

He served 15 years in the military, qualifying for a pension, and retired to Maharashtra to take up social work. He was awarded two of India’s highest civilian awards for his work, which includes drought-relief efforts and working to create a sustainable Gandhian “model village.”

By the 1990s, Mr. Hazare had begun staging hunger strikes in Maharashtra to pressure state officials linked to corruption. Several were ultimately removed from office. At one point, countercharges against him claimed that money from one of his trusts had been used to pay for his birthday celebration. A government-appointed commission concluded that the money was improperly spent, but Mr. Hazare was never implicated in any personal corruption.

His national profile has risen sharply since this spring, when he came to New Delhi to begin a hunger strike demanding that the government introduce a bill in Parliament to create the anticorruption agency, known as a Lokpal. When thousands of people unexpectedly came out in support, government officials invited Team Anna to join a special committee drafting the Lokpal bill.

For several weeks during the early summer, Mr. Hazare was a periodic visitor at a government guesthouse in New Delhi while attending committee meetings. During an interview in early June, he often spoke with dramatic flourish about the need to eliminate corruption, while also predicting that people would support him again, if necessary.

“I’m confident that people will stand up again,” he said. He had been traveling the country, appearing at rallies to gather support for a Lokpal. “Yes, I feel empowered,” he said in June. “It happens because a large number of people are standing with you. Otherwise, what do I have? I’m a beggar. I live in a temple. I do not have a bankbook. I have only a plant and a bed.”

His methods and goals have not impressed everyone. Critics accused him of trying to hijack the democratic process through protest pressure tactics. Others warned that the type of Lokpal he envisioned could upset the balance of the country’s democratic institutions and accused his group of refusing to compromise.

Ultimately, negotiations broke down in June on the Lokpal legislation. The government has since introduced a bill in Parliament during the current session, but Mr. Hazare has criticized it as too weak. This week, he came to New Delhi to begin another hunger strike when the police arrested him.

Under the compromise reached for his release, Mr. Hazare agreed to limit his hunger strike to 15 days, and the police said they would remove their original restrictions on the number of supporters allowed to attend the protest.

Outside Tihar Jail and elsewhere in the city, people have chanted Mr. Hazare’ s name and voiced anger over the pervasiveness of corruption in daily life. One college student complained that rich families are able to buy admission for their children to top colleges. A man who has a trucking business complained that he had to pay a 10 percent bribe to a petty official in order to get a certificate proving he paid a transport tax on his vehicle.

“Today, when we were coming, a traffic cop stopped our vehicle and suggested that we shell out some money,” said Ajab Singh Gujar, the owner of the trucking business. “I shouted, ‘Victory to Anna Hazare!’

“The cop immediately allowed us to pass through without any bribe.”

COURTESY : NEW YORK TIMES

Beware of the Government Lokpal Bill

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Corruption

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ARVIND KEJRIWAL IN LIEU OF ANNA HAZARE AND INDIA AGAINST CORRUPTION

I reviewed the Government’s Lokpal bill in great detail. I am deeply concerned and not to mention alarmed with what I learned from it. Government has completely ignored the wishes of the common man and made a mockery of our hard fought struggle for strong anti-corruption laws. I have summarized the most troubling aspects of the government version here and suggested possible steps that everyone of you can take to help in this movement.

We had been demanding that an institution called Lokpal should be set up for central government and a Lokayukta should be set up for each state government through the same Bill. Lokpal would receive and investigate corruption complaints against central government employees and politicians. Lokayukta would do that job in respective states. However, the Cabinet has rejected our demand. Only a few senior-most officers in central government have been brought within the jurisdiction of Lokpal. All officials and politicians in state governments have been left out.

What does that mean?

  • It means that rampant corruption in Panchayat works would continue as it is. Through the use of RTI Act, many people across the country have revealed how payments are routinely made for ghost works. Check dams exist only on paper. List of beneficiaries of various government schemes contain bogus names. Wages of poorest people are denied and siphoned off under NREGA. Social audits in several states have exposed corruption running into thousands of crores in NREGA. Medicines are routinely diverted to black market from government hospitals. Teachers do not turn up in government schools. They pay a part of their salaries to Basic Shiksha Adhikari to mark their attendance. 80% of Rs 30,000 crores of ration subsidy is siphoned off. People living below poverty line are turned away by ration shopkeepers because their rations are diverted to black market. Much of this money reaches the party coffers or the senior-most politicians. All this will continue even after the enactment of government’s Lokpal Bill because all of this is outside its jurisdiction.
  • In cities, roads would continue to break after a few months of being constructed. Flyovers would continue to collapse. Streetlights will still not light up. Parks would continue to remain dilapidated. The builders would continue to fleece ordinary consumers. You would still need to pay bribes to get your passport or income tax refund. Building plan will not be passed without a bribe. Government’s Lokpal Bill does not cover any of this.
  • Adarsh Housing scam is not covered under Government’s Lokpal. Reddy brothers will continue to loot our mines and minerals. Commonwealth Games, Fodder scam, Taj Corridor Scam, Yamuna Expressway scam, Jharkhand Mukti Morcha scam, Cash for vote scam – none of these scams are covered under Government’s Lokpal Bill.
  • Members of Parliament and MLAs would continue to take bribes to ask questions or vote in Parliament and legislative assemblies because Lokpal would not have the powers to investigate them.
  • Prime Minister, Chief Ministers, MPs, MLAs, municipal councilors, sarpanches, judges, all state government employees, all Group B, Group C and group D employees of the central government – all are out of the jurisdiction of Government’s Lokpal Bill.
  • Interestingly, if any citizen makes a complaint of corruption against any official to Lokpal and if it lacks adequate evidence, then as per government’s bill, the citizen would face two years of minimum imprisonment. And the government would provide a free advocate to the corrupt official to file a case against the citizen. But if the citizen is able to prove that the official has indeed indulged in corruption, there is just six months of minimum imprisonment. Therefore, rather than the corrupt and corruption, the government bill is targeted against those who dare raise their voice against corruption. In short, it discourages people from reporting acts of corruption!
  • 13 people, who had dared to raise their voice against corruption, were murdered in the last one year. We had demanded that Lokpal should have the powers and duty to provide protection to such people. Government Bill does not have any such provision.
  • Government has retained its control over CBI. So, CBI would continue to avoid taking action against a future Raja until Supreme Court admonished them. Accounts of Quattrochis would continue to be defrozen in secrecy against national interests. CBI would continue to be used to arm twist Mayawatis, Laloo Yadavs, Jayalalithas and Mulayam Singhs into submission. Corruption money would continue to be siphoned off to Swiss accounts.
  • Government’s Lokpal Bill is also unconstitutional. Prime Minister does not enjoy any immunity from investigations under the constitution. Exclusion of Prime Minister from Lokpal Bill is unconstitutional.
  • Selection and removal of Lokpal members will be completely in the control of the government. Out of 9 member selection committee, five will be from ruling establishment, thus effectively giving powers in the hands of the government to appoint the most corrupt, pliable and politically loyal people as Lokpal members.
  • High Courts and Supreme Court would continue to take more than 20 years to dispose appeals in corruption cases because our plea to set up special benches to hear such appeals has also been turned down.

Government says that there are 1.25 crore government employees in the country. Government refuses to bring them under Lokpal Bill because it would need large number of anti-corruption staff to keep a check on them. Isn’t that an absurd excuse? India is a huge country. Obviously, it has large number of employees. Can the government leave them unchecked and allow them to loot the people and the country? Under law, corruption is a crime – as heinous as murder or rape. If tomorrow, the incidence of murders or rapes increases as much as we have corruption now, would the government turn around and say that this country has 120 crore population and since they would need large number of policemen to check crime, they would not do it?

The country seems to be in the clutches of highly corrupt people. It has been reported that in the Cabinet Meeting, the Prime Minister, including some of his other Cabinet colleagues, kept pleading that PMbe included within the Lokpal Bill. However, the corrupt within the Cabinet had the last say. The Prime Minister was rendered helpless, though one wonders the reasons for his helplessness.What are our options?  Some people feel that Anna is unreasonable. They say that an indefinite fast is a brahmastra and should be used as a last resort. Haven’t we already reached the end of the road?Friends, I must confess, that the road ahead is extremely challenging. Government is on a path to try and crush the movement at any cost. We need the active participation of every single Indian in order to fight back. If the Government’s bill becomes law we are literally gifting our country to the corrupt people to further plunder our resources.
Like I have said before its now or never.Let every citizen in this country take one week’s off from his normal work from 16th August, the day Anna starts his indefinite fast, and take to the streets – in front of his house or at the crossings or in parks – with a tricolor in his hands shouting slogans against corruption. Let students take off from their schools and colleges. Let everyone take to streets. If this happens, we will achieve our goal within a week. Government can crush one Anna but it cannot crush 120 crore Annas. Government can impose section 144 on one jantar mantar. But it cannot impose a curfew on the whole country.Can we count on you support to participate in one final attempt to save our country from the corrupt?
Arvind Kejriwal
India Against Corruption (IAC)
http://www.indiaagainstcorruption.org
Give missed call at 022-61550789 to stay connected
Signing Common Platform Petition to PM at :<<LINK>>
Email :indiaagainstcorruption.2010@gmail.com
LINK TO GOVERNMENT LOKPAL BILL 2011

 

‘Bill designed to protect the corrupt and victimise protesters’

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Dr. Kiran Bedi @ SWIM Conference. SWIM - Succe...

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The gulf between the government and Team Anna widened on Thursday, with the civil society members burning copies of the Lokpal Bill, and Union Ministers P. Chidambaram, Kapil Sibal and V. Narayansamy terming the act an “affront” to Parliament.

As the government tabled the Bill in the Lok Sabha, social activist Anna Hazare, in his native village of Ralegaon Sidhi in Maharashtra, and his team here burnt copies. They said the Bill was designed “to protect the corrupt and victimise, harass and punish those who raise their voice against corruption.” Some people later burnt the copies at Jantar Mantar here.

Asserting that he would go ahead with his fast here from August 16, Mr. Hazare said he felt cheated as the government had persuaded him to give up his agitation in April, promising a strong, effective and comprehensive Bill, but came up with a weak piece of legislation that served no purpose. (However, till Thursday, Mr. Hazare has not been given permission to go head with his protest at any venue in New Delhi.)

Leading the protest at Kaushambi in Ghaziabad, Arvind Kejriwal, Prashant Bhushan, Kiran Bedi and Swami Agnivesh said the government’s version of the Bill was “anti-poor and anti-aam aadmi,” as it did not deal with day-to-day corruption and contained “draconian provisions” against whistle-blowers.

“We challenge the authority of the democratically elected government of the day, which has started behaving in a unilateral and dictatorial manner,” Mr. Kejriwal said.

Claiming that the Bill was structurally flawed, he said that while excluding the office of Prime Minister, the higher judiciary and MPs, it did not cover the lower bureaucracy also and lacked a grievance redress mechanism to deal with everyday corruption that had taken root. “Parliament has been given a fait accompli Bill, which is structurally so weak that even the standing committee cannot make many changes.”

‘Sarkari Bill’

Mr. Bhushan said five of the nine members on the committee to appoint the Lokpal were “sarkari.” “Not only that, the removal of the Lokpal is totally in the hands of the government. As soon as the removal of the Lokpal is recommended, the government can issue orders of suspension, so how is the Lokpal independent?”

Mr. Kejriwal and Mr. Bhushan were members of the joint drafting committee, which was to work out the draft of a Lokpal Bill. But that exercise failed as there was no meeting ground between the government and civil society members on crucial issues.

Cabinet approves draft of Lokpal Bill; PM, judiciary kept out

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Arvind Kejriwal

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The Prime Minister and the judiciary have been excluded from the ambit of the Lokpal Bill.

According to this draft, the body will have a chairperson and eight members, including four judicial members.

Information minister Ambika Soni said the chairperson would be a serving or retired Supreme Court judge. She said the Cabinet had approved the draft with minor changes.

Civil society members have expressed their unhappiness with the draft. Kiran Bedi sais, the current government draft was fractured and unhealthy. She said the bill was not in favour of the common man.

The decision to review the Lokpal Bill comes as social activist Read the rest of this entry »